The Dutch Republic recognized the United States as an independent government today in 1782 with John Adams as the Ambassador to the Netherlands. Now WE know em

John Adams

John Adams

In December of 1777, Morocco became the first nation to recognize the newly formed United States of America.

By 1779, Benjamin Franklin had established a United States mission in Paris after France had officially recognized the United States in 1778.

U.S. Ambassador to the Netherlands

Early in 1782, John Adams was appointed by the second Continental Congress of the Confederation as America’s first Minister Plenipotentiary to Holland.

Adams departed for Amsterdam accompanied by his 15 year old son John Quincy Adams.

Then on April 19, 1782, aided by the Dutch Patriot leader Joan van der Capellen tot den Pol, John Adams was officially recognized by the Dutch Republic as the United States Ambassador to the Netherlands.

John Adams purchased a house at Fluwelen Burgwal 18 in the Hague, establishing the first American owned Embassy on foreign soil anywhere in the world.

A medallion produced in Amsterdam for John Adams in 1782 by Johann Georg Holtzhey to celebrate recognition of the United States as an independent nation by The Netherlands, from the coin collection of the Teylers Museum.

A medallion produced in Amsterdam for John Adams in 1782 by Johann Georg Holtzhey to celebrate recognition of the United States as an independent nation by The Netherlands, from the coin collection of the Teylers Museum.

John Adams went on to become the first Vice President of the United States on April 21, 1789, and the second President of the United States on March 4, 1797.

His son John Quincy Adams went on to become the 6th President of the United States on March 4, 1825.

Now WE know em

 

US Embassy in The Hague, 2009

US Embassy in The Hague, 2009

 

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