Today in 1845, Florida was admitted as a slave state and the 27th state of the United States. Now WE know em

Today in 1845, Florida was admitted as a slave state and the 27th state of the United States. Now WE know em

John Tyler, 10th President of the United States of America

In 1819, by terms of the Adams-Onís Treaty, Spain ceded Florida to the United States in exchange for $5 million and the American renunciation of any claims on Texas that they might have from the Louisiana Purchase.

In 1830, the Indian Removal Act was passed and as white settlement increased, pressure grew on the United States government to remove the Indians from their lands in Florida.

In 1832, the United States government signed the Treaty of Payne’s Landing with some of the Seminole chiefs, promising them lands west of the Mississippi River if they agreed to leave Florida voluntarily. Many of the Seminoles left at this time, while those who remained prepared to defend their claims to the land.

The U.S. Army arrived in 1835 to enforce the treaty under pressure from white settlers, and the Second Seminole War began at the end of the year with the Dade Massacre, when Seminoles ambushed and killed or mortally wounded all but one in a group of 110 Army troops, plus Major Dade and seven officers, marching from Fort Brooke (Tampa) to reinforce Fort King (Ocala).

Between 900 and 1,500 Seminole Indian warriors employed guerrilla tactics against United States Army troops for seven years.

In 1842, the U.S. finally gave up its fight against the few hundred remaining Seminole in Florida, who were deep in the Everglades and impossible to defeat or dislodge.

In 1844, President John Tyler appointed John Branch Florida’s territorial governor until an election could be held under the new state constitution.

Then on March 3, 1845, 1 day before the end of President Tyler’s term in office, Florida became the 27th state of the United States of America, as a slave state.

Now WE know em

 

 

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