The 11th President of the United States James K. Polk sat for a portrait today in 1849, making him the first President to have his portrait taken while still in office. Now WE know em

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James K. Polk became the 11th President of the United States on March 4, 1845.

He also became the first President of the United States to be photographed while in office.

The first photograph taken of President Polk and his cabinet (minus Secretary of State James Buchanan) was taken sometime early in his administration, as he had pledged to serve only one term.

Front row, left to right: John Y. Mason, William L. Marcy, President James K. Polk, Robert J. Walker Back row, left to right: Cave Johnson, George Bancroft Secretary of State James Buchanan is absent.

Front row, left to right: John Y. Mason, William L. Marcy, President James K. Polk, Robert J. Walker Back row, left to right: Cave Johnson, George Bancroft. Secretary of State James Buchanan is absent.

 

This photograph of President Polk and his cabinet is also the first photograph taken inside the White House. The Polk cabinet photo above was taken by John Plumbe in the White House State Dining Room and shows new wallpaper and chairs purchased for the White House by President Polk.

Then Zachary Taylor won the 1848 presidential election.

As president-elect Taylor decided to keep his distance from Washington, President Polk traveled to New York City one month before leaving office.

While in New York City on February 14, 1849, President Polk posed for a three-quarter length Daguerrotype taken by Mathew Brady (shown at top of this article).

Polk, however, was not actually the first President to have his photograph taken; John Quincy Adams had his portrait taken in 1843, some 14 years after leaving office.

 Now WE know em

 

 

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